Can I take Xanax at work?

Active ingredientAddictive drugPsychotropic
AlprazolamNoNo
Pharmacological groupAnxiolytics

All information

Brief information

What is it and what is it used for?

Contains Xanax as an active ingredient Alprazolam, a substance from the group of benzodiazepines. Xanax is anti-anxiety, relaxing, and calming.

What do you need to consider before use?

If any of the points listed here in the long description apply to you, you should not take Xanax.

How is it used?

The doctor will determine the dosage that is suitable for you, the duration of the treatment and the time when the tablets are to be taken. The usual dosage is 0.5 to 1.5 mg daily divided into several gifts.

What are the possible side effects?

The most common side effects are:

  • Depression and drowsiness,
  • Drowsiness, exhaustion, irritability,
  • Poor memory, dizziness, headache, speech disorders,
  • Disruption of movement sequences,
  • Dry mouth, constipation, weight change.

You can find more detailed information in the long description.

How should it be stored?

Keep away from light and dry at room temperature (15-25 ° C) and out of the reach of children.

What is it and what is it used for?

Xanax / -retard contains alprazolam, a substance from the group of benzodiazepines, as the active ingredient. Xanax / -retard has an anti-anxiety, relaxing and calming effect. It is used to treat anxiety, tension and panic disorders.

Prescriptened by your doctor.

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What do you need to consider before use?

Simultaneous use of alcohol or certain other medicines can increase the effects of medicines containing benzodiazepines, such as Xanax.

Xanax must not be taken in case of hypersensitivity to benzodiazepines or any other component of the preparation as well as muscle weakness (myasthenia gravis), severe breathing disorders and respiratory failure during sleep (sleep apnea syndrome). Xanax must not be taken with certain antifungal agents or agents used to treat AIDS (called protease inhibitors).

This medicine can impair your ability to react, drive and use tools or machines!

 

Dependency risk

Can Taking Xanax? as with all benzodiazepine-containing preparations? lead to addiction. This can occur especially with uninterrupted use over a long period of time (in certain cases after a few weeks) and results in withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation of the drug. Restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, poor concentration, headaches and sweating can then occur. These symptoms usually subside after two to three weeks.

To keep the risk of developing addiction as low as possible, please note the following:

Only take Xanax as directed by your doctor.

Under no circumstances should you increase the dose prescribed by your doctor.

Tell your doctor if you want to stop taking the medicine.

Your doctor will periodically decide whether treatment needs to be continued.

Long-term use (usually more than four weeks) may only take place under careful medical supervision.

Xanax must be used carefully in patients with impaired liver function. The effects of Xanax are increased by taking sedatives, strong pain relievers and other drugs that affect the central nervous system and alcoholic beverages at the same time. Certain antibiotics, medicines for high blood pressure, depression, and some other medicines can affect and make Xanax more effective. It is therefore imperative that you inform your doctor that you are taking other medicines.

Xanax should be used carefully in elderly patients because they are more sensitive to Xanax than younger patients.

Xanax may only be given to patients who are prone to drug abuse, alcohol addicts and drug addicts in exceptional situations and under strict medical supervision.

The use of Xanax in children and adolescents under 18 years of age has not been established.

Inform your doctor or pharmacist if you suffer from other illnesses, have allergies or are taking or applying other medicines (including those you have bought yourself!).

Xanax should not be used during pregnancy, especially during the first three months, and while breast-feeding. If you are pregnant or want to become pregnant, it is imperative that you consult your doctor.

If Xanax is used late in pregnancy or during childbirth, side effects may occur in the newborn. Newborns whose mothers have frequently taken benzodiazepine-containing preparations during pregnancy may develop addiction and therefore show withdrawal symptoms.

How is it used?

The doctor will determine the dosage that is suitable for you, the duration of the treatment and the time when the tablets are to be taken.
Usual dosage instructions

Xanax:

The usual dosage is 0.5 to 1.5 mg daily in divided doses. Depending on the patient's response, up to 4 mg daily, and in isolated cases up to 6 mg, may be necessary. The tablets are swallowed whole with some liquid.

The Xanax 2 mg tablet is oblong and has three break lines. To divide, the tablet is placed with the embossing facing up on a hard surface and pressed onto the center of the tablet with the thumb. In the same way, the two halves can be further divided. This results in 4 parts of 0.5 mg each.

Xanax retard:

The Xanax retard tablets are taken once or twice a day. If taken once a day, the tablet should preferably be taken in the morning. The usual starting dose is 0.5 to 1.5 mg daily; Depending on the patient's response, up to 4 mg daily, and in isolated cases up to 6 mg, may be necessary. The tablets are swallowed whole with some liquid and must not be bitten or divided.

Further dosage instructions for all tablet formulations

The dosage must be reduced in elderly patients or in those with a weakened general condition.

An increase or decrease in the dose must be prescribed by the doctor and carried out exactly according to the instructions. In particular, Xanax / -retard must never be stopped suddenly.

The use of Xanax / -retard has not been studied in children and adolescents under 18 years of age and therefore cannot be recommended (see also "When should you take caution when taking Xanax / -retard?").

Do not change the prescribed dosage on your own. If you think that the medicine is too weak or too strong, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

What are the possible side effects?

Side effects mostly occur at the beginning of treatment and usually disappear with treatment or with a dose reduction.

As with all benzodiazepines, behavioral disorders and paradoxical reactions such as impaired memory, confusion, aggressiveness, agitation or hallucinations can occur in rare cases. If such symptoms occur, the doctor must be informed immediately.

The following side effects may occur when taking Xanax / -retard:

Very common (affects more than 1 in 10 people): Depression, drowsiness, drowsiness, exhaustion, irritability, poor memory, dizziness, headache, speech disorders, movement disorders, dry mouth, constipation, weight change.

Common (affects 1 to 10 users in 100):

Confusion, disorientation, decreased sex drive (libido), feeling of anxiety, insomnia, nervousness, imbalance, incoordination, disturbed attention, insomnia, lethargy, tremors, blurred vision, decreased appetite, nausea.

Uncommon (affects 1 to 10 users in 1,000):

Memory lapses (amnesia), muscle weakness, drug / drug addiction.

The following side effects have also been observed since the market launch:

Affect disorder (hypomania, mania), hallucination, anger, aggression, hostility, pathological restlessness, absent-minded thinking, increased psychomotor activity, drug or drug abuse, drug withdrawal syndrome, abnormal involuntary muscle tension, gastrointestinal complaints, inflammation of the liver (hepatitis) Liver function, jaundice, bladder weakness, urinary retention, skin inflammation, angioedema (fluid accumulation in the skin and / or mucous membrane), increased sensitivity of the skin to light (photosensitivity), sexual dysfunction, altered sexual sensation, irregular menstruation, increased intraocular pressure, fluid accumulation e.g. in the arms or in the Legs (peripheral edema), hypersensitivity reactions (such as hives, swelling in the throat and larynx).

If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This also applies in particular to side effects that are not listed in this leaflet.

How should it be stored?

The drug may only be used up to the date marked “EXP” on the pack.

Keep away from light and dry at room temperature (15-25 ° C) and out of the reach of children.

Your doctor or pharmacist can provide you with further information. These people have the detailed information for specialists.

additional Information

What is in Xanax / Retard?

Xanax:

1 tablet of 0.25 mg contains 0.25 mg alprazolam. It is white and oval and has “Upjohn 29” embossed on one side and a groove on the other.

1 tablet of 0.5 mg contains 0.5 mg alprazolam. It is pink and oval and is embossed with “Upjohn 55” on one side and a groove on the other.

1 tablet of 1 mg contains 1 mg alprazolam. It is purple and oval and is embossed with “Upjohn 90” on one side and a groove on the other.

1 tablet of 2 mg contains 2 mg of alprazolam. It is white and oblong and is embossed with “U94” on one side and three break lines on each side.

The tablets also contain the following excipients:

Lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, docusate sodium, highly dispersed silicon dioxide, corn starch, magnesium stearate, coloring: erythrosine (E127; tablets of 0.5 mg and 1 mg), indigotine (E132; tablets of 1 mg); Preservative: Sodium Benzoate (E211).

Xanax retard:

1 prolonged-release tablet of 0.5 mg contains 0.5 mg alprazolam. It is blue and round and has “P&U 57” embossed on one side.

1 prolonged-release tablet of 1 mg contains 1 mg alprazolam. It is white and round and has “P&U 59” embossed on one side.

1 prolonged-release tablet of 2 mg contains 2 mg alprazolam. It is blue and pentagonal and has “P&U 66” embossed on one side.

1 3 mg prolonged-release tablet contains 3 mg alprazolam. It is white and triangular and has “P&U 68” embossed on one side.

The sustained-release tablets also contain the following additives:

Lactose, methylhydroxypropyl cellulose, colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stearate; Color: indigotine (E132; tablets of 0.5 mg and 2 mg).
Approval number

Xanax: 43216 (Swissmedic).

Xanax retard: 52866 (Swissmedic).

Where can you get Xanax / -retard? Which packs are available?

In pharmacies, only with a prescription.

Packs of 30 and 100 tablets.

Marketing authorization holder

Pfizer PFE Switzerland GmbH, Zurich.

This leaflet was last checked by the medicines authority (Swissmedic) in May 2019.

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